Kristianne Molina

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Kristianne Molina Studio

Photo Credit: Kristianne Molina


Kristianne Molina

Jersey City, NJ

Artist


How did you get started in your craft – and how does your craft reflect your personal aesthetic? 

The Genesis of my exposure started at childhood. Going to practice and committing to art classes took discipline and became foundation for different facets of my life: art, athletics, writing, and relationships. I learned that knowledge and skill evolve which helped developed my aesthetics. I believe in aesthetics and then there’s style, they are mostly synonymous.

How have the women in your life been instrumental in your life and career? 

In a fundamental sense, women are instrumental to whom I have become.

I have a single mother that brought my brother and I from the Philippines and raised us in the east coast. My grandmother came to New York and worked at Zaro’s bakery for 30 years to help support eight of her children, mostly living in the Philippines.

I’ve met women along the way that I admired and they have helped navigate my way. It takes a village to raise a child and I was lucky enough to have strong women along my path. My high school art teachers were women and my varsity basketball coach was a woman. Most of my favorite artists are women.

At the Women’s March before inauguration I walked with my mother who last marched at the People’s Power Revolution in the Philippines and women artists in my community at Mana Contemporary. That was an empowering moment.

Cultural trends constantly change. What do you do to stay relevant, connected, and ahead of the curve?

Constantly learning and unlearning. Trends are so catchy sometimes I try not to get sucked into it like quicksand. When I start searching for something that doesn’t exist often I feel a need to create that nonexistent thing.

Some days I make responsive work to current events and try to learn more about the subjects. I feel connected in that way. When we read the news and hear about international affairs or cultural crisis it’s hard to feel connected when your reality is someplace else. Honestly take time to reflect and physically respond creatively from a genuine place.

I’m not sure if I am ever ahead of the curve haha.

At the Women’s March before inauguration I walked with my mother who last marched at the People’s Power Revolution in the Philippines and women artists in my community at Mana Contemporary. That was an empowering moment.

Kristianne Molina Studio

Photo Credit: Kristianne Molina

How do you keep track of your personal and business goals – and stay creative at the same time (even when you’re exhausted)? 

I’m trying to be kinder to myself and its been helping with productivity. Doing the most essential thing, listening to my body, resting when I’m tired, and eating when I am hungry, and daydreaming. Activities we take for granted.

I try to ride the waves of full energy when I’m really fired up to work on a project, write down an idea, or problem solve an idea. That energy pushes me through exhaustion.

When we read the news and hear about international affairs or cultural crisis it’s hard to feel connected when your reality is someplace else. Honestly take time to reflect and physically respond creatively from a genuine place.

How important are mentors? Who is your mentor? 

In Ryan Holiday’s book Ego is the enemy he calls this Plus, Minus and Equals. Plus is someone who is teaching you, Minus is someone you are passing it on to, and Equal is someone who is your match. You should have people filling each category.

Mentorship is essential. If you don’t have a mentor, find one. A mentorship is organic chemistry, and you can’t fake the funk. I believe a mentorship must have mutual respect.

I have mentors for different facets of my life. Relationships with people are like plants; some are watered more frequently than others.

Kristianne Molina Studio

Photo Credit: Kristianne Molina

In Ryan Holiday’s book Ego is the enemy he calls this Plus, Minus and Equals. Plus is someone who is teaching you, Minus is someone you are passing it on to, and Equal is someone who is your match. You should have people filling each category.

What is your advice for women entering creative fields or starting their own business? 

I believe understanding your perspective is important. Take some time to assess your resources and build with what you have currently. Own what makes you different. It took me a while to wake up to the fact that most days I am the only Asian in the room and being a Filipino was a marginalized Asian culture until the last few years.

When I decided to have my first child and chose to continue my creative work, someone had the audacity to say to me, “I thought you would give up once you got pregnant.” We’re living in the 21st century. Overall, I’m grateful for the opportunity to grow independently outside of my social roles, because that to me, it is a luxury.

Work hard and be nice.

Kristianne Molina Studio

Photo Credit: Kristianne Molina

Own what makes you different. It took me a while to wake up to the fact that most days I am the only Asian in the room and being a Filipino was a marginalized Asian culture until the last few years.

Place that inspires me the most… Nature, a library and the ocean, unfortunately all three are in detrimental states. But there is beauty in the transient.

I feel most powerful when… When I give to others and myself freely, and it doesn’t have to be monetary.

I love what I do because… It scares me and it frees me.

Best advice I have ever received… Take advice but don’t take advice. Don’t wait to be inspired.

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